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I’ve seen so many adorable rag quilts floating around blogland recently that I knew I’d be making one when I tackled Susannah’s {very purple} room makeover.
I didn’t use any pattern or formal instructions so it may not have been the most direct way of getting it done, but I’m happy with how it turned out, and most importantly, Susannah loves her new quilt!

I (stupidly) guessed on the size and it barely fits her twin bed.
Why on earth didn’t I just look up the size of a twin comforter?
Who knows, but next time I’ll know to google that before I start.

Rag quilts aren’t super hard, but they are quite time-consuming. By far the worst part is clipping the seams at the end. I was determined to stay up and finish the night I had it all pieced together and I was up past 2am clipping. Yikes!

My next project is to make her some cute, coordinating pillows!

I don’t have a full photo tutorial for the quilt, but here’s a quick rundown of the details.

 

  • Figure out size of quilt (google!), and pick coordinating fabrics (I used 8 different varieties of flannel, minky, corduroy, and cotton, but flannel works the best because the edges fray).

 

  • Cut 7″ square blocks of fabric for front, and the same amount of 7″ blocks for back (I used flannel).

 

  • Cut 6″ squares of batting.

 

  • Sandwich batting between front and back fabrics and sew an X down the center of each block, stopping 1/2″ from all edges.

 

  • Arrange blocks in pattern of choice and begin sewing rows together, one at a time. Make sure you sew the blocks together with back of the fabric together, making the seam on the front of the fabric.

 

  • After all the rows are finished, sew each row together, making sure to keep to your pattern. (I found the entire process easiest by laying it out on the floor and taking it one block/row at a time, leaving the rest in my pattern on the floor.

 

  • After all the rows are sewn together, sew 1/2″ seam around the entire edge of the quilt.

 

  • Clip all seams 1/2″ apart, being careful not to cut too close to your thread. Prepare to do this for several hours and for your hand to be screaming in pain by the end. :)
  • Wash and dry to really fluff up the frayed seams.

And totally off-topic, but isn’t her sparkly purple canopy cute?
Now she really feels like a princess!
(I’ll post more details of her room makeover soon!)

Parties I link to: Craft-O-Maniac, Lines Across My Face, Sew Can Do, Sew Chatty, C.R.A.F.T., Making the World Cuter, Skip to My Lou, The Southern InstituteChef In Training, Confessions of a Stay at Home Mom, A Bowl Full of Lemons, Sweet Little Gals, Vintage Wanna Bee, Sugar Bee Crafts, Funky Polkadot Giraffe, The Kurtz Corner, Todays Creative Blog, Tip Junkie, Mandy’s Recipe Box,Rook No. 17, the Sasse Life, My Girlish Whims, Handy Man, Crafty Woman, Sew Much Ado, Polka Dots on Parade, Ginger Snap Crafts, Southern Lovely, House of HepworthsThe Crafty Blog StalkerSomewhat Simple, Something Swanky, A Glimpse Inside, Crafty Scrappy Happy, Delicate Construction, Simply Sweet Home, Tidy Mom, Fingerprints on the Fridge, Kojo Designs, Thirty Handmade Days, Sassy Sites, Tatertots and Jello, Bacon Time, Flamingo Toes, Six Sisters Stuff, Sweet as Sugar Cookies, Naptime Creations, Crazy for Crust, Lolly Jane Boutique,